English Teacher: Why I Had to Leave a Profession I Loved

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It took me 34 years in special education to make the same decision. I would have worked with kids forever if we could just burn 90% of the paperwork and data collection. As I told parents on numerous occasions, I can work with your child or I can take data, but not in the same minutes. Which would you prefer? Guess what the answer was.

Diane Ravitch's blog

In this post, a veteran teacher with 30 years of experience explains why she had to retire. She didn’t want to. But the obsession with data-based decision-making finally broke her spirit.

She recounts incidents where she was able to help students, where students gave her their trust, where classes learned to love literature as she did. She remembers staff meetings devoted to lessons and students, not to data analysis. As all the rewarding parts of her work were eliminated, she realized that the reforms made it I possible to do what she loved est: to teach.

She writes:

“I remember a time when department meetings, faculty meetings, and in-service days revolved around reading, sharing ideas, learning about our subjects—and not around the only topics that seem to matter today: lesson plan format, testing, rubrics, teacher evaluations and technological gimmicks. Watch your back! If you don’t conform it will be…

View original post 247 more words

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